Archive for the ‘origami tessellation instructions’ Category

Another Year Another Fold

000_2759 by you.

I just got back from New York.  I arrived Thursday and came back today.  I stayed with Adrienne in Brooklyn in a converted garage.  Like last year I didn’t take classes, because I taught 5 classes and figured there wouldn’t be time.  I missed seeing “Into the Fold” but did get to meet a lot of interesting folks.  Interesting talk with Ray Schamp.  Added a new face to Yaffa, Goran.  Made a “purse.”  Slept little, enjoyed my time thoroughly.  Saw more of NY than usual.  One thing that sometimes gets lost with convention goers is that we are in New York which is a fabulous city and the 4 square blocks around FIT are not where the flavor is.  Harassed a bunch of people smarter than me about curvature and promptly “fired” them for not having the answer to my “sortoff” questions, although they both suggested I harass Erik Demaine which I will be doing as soon as I can craft an email that doesn’t make me feel slow.  My questions arn’t really concise or clear, simply put I don’t understand enough about curved rotation to understand what is going on.  

The people in my box design course did amazing and I was happy that everyone who attended my Labyrnth class understood the technique.  Ben Parker’s work has definately progressed and Joel is now working on busts along with the faces.  The form of the chest was amazing.  Seth has great work and I loved Sipho’s way of displaying models.  Goran has started pulling apart and approaching very organic nifty forms.  Ana Sofia helped me make two large models for the oversized folding challenge (Two thumbs up for Sok) and disappeared before I could say my goodbyes.  Joseph’s perfect piggy “Cleofis” has a lovely spot on my shelf (gracias oh Master JoWu;P.)  Michael was the most adorable child ever.  Brian Chan is still making amazing models and Alexander Soukas had lovely tessellations.  Daniel Kwan is probably the most precise folder ever and has little crease elves helping him.  Philip and Christiane were my first picture in NY and it was of their feet!  

Shoe Love by you.

We took a terrific three hour boat tour on Tuesday, thanks Eric (for everything).  A big thanks to Adrienne for her couch and her roommates tolerance of a squatter.

Adrienne and me 

000_2748 by you.
Ben Parker looking somber on boat
000_2755 by you.
My temporary bedroom and the plexiglass bridge
000_2737 by you.
The happy Wu

Bemused Wu by you.

Goran, Bernie, Joel

Goran

Bernie Peyton

Joel Cooper

Christianne, PCB, Tomohiro

Christiane

PCB

Tomohiro

Ape challenge, Sipho, Ben

Ape challenge.  I adore the pointing laughing monnkey

Sipho

Ben Parker

Oversized folding challenge (Photo also known as “Shri’s Bum”) Ray Schamp

Big folds and Shri's but

Ray Schamp

My exhibit (the blue thing is the curvy thing I wanted to ask questions about)

Me by you.

There were a bunch of things I sadly didn’t get photos of as I was rushing to do this before heading off to teach, so for the pictures I missed sorry and for everyone I had great conversations with thanks.

More photos here http://www.flickr.com/photos/christine42/

The photos are tagged “ousa 2009”

See you next year (maybe)

Thanks,

Christine

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3D Origami Tessellation Suggestions and Other Stuff

Suggestions For Making 2d Tessellations 3d

 

  1. Take any flat tiling and see if you have free flaps of paper.  When you have free edges take the flaps push up from underneath and push into the center of the flap from the top.  Consider the flat tessellation a net for an infinite number of tessellations.
  2. This does not have to be done symmetrically, but find the pattern so you can repeat it (although randomization can be interesting and is a good thing to play with).
  3. If you have successive layers then push the paper in or out in varying areas of the free flaps to get a wide variety of different designs.
  4. To create variation make the pleat depth vary.  Instead of folding one layer over fold two.  It gives you more potential collapses and variations.
  5. If you have done Eric Gjerde’s spread hex I have a variation you can fold on this site.  Just look for the Labyrinth tutorial.  Take any you have made and start playing with variation on with and 3 dimensionality.  
  6. Another technique is to layer grids.  First create a tessellation and then overlay another as if the grid was untouched.  Generally this gives you extra paper that is constrained that you can play with.

 

The following two pics show the consequences of successive layering of pushing free edges in and out.  The flat tessellation is first

Layered Pleating by you.

From above

Layered Pleating 3ded by you.

From Underneath

Layered Pleating 3ded by you.

 

Other Stuff

E-mails about predecessors

I always appreciate information about designs and overlaps that people send me.  Sometimes I see the connection and at times I do not (as I once received an email with only an attachment of a crane in regards to a tessellation), but it is always interesting to see connections and I always try to post links/info (although sometimes a bit slow).  

Deb Pun Discoe sent me an email “…your heart lock reminded me of Alfredo Giunta’s “Angel” as published  in an out-of-print “Origami : 30 fold-by-fold projects” compiled by Paulo Mulatinho”

Karen Reed also sent me an e-mail about a potential forerunner to the takeout container “I was just looking at the Florence Temko collection, mounted by Diana Lee’s Origami Resource Center website, and noticed this model:“Desktop Basket by Florence Temko Variation of a traditional model”  You can view the picture gallery here http://www.origami-resource-center.com/Temko-B.html .

Thanks to both ladies for the information.

Slightly funny (at least to me) variant of a Valentine’s day bowl.  “Cough Up Your Heart”

Trying to make faces from pleats has been interesting.  This was playing with a heart bowl I made.  Only tried to make a nose and hint at a chin.  The chin I took away because it didn’t work.

Coughing Up Hearts by you.

“Origami Tessellations” by Eric Gjerde and Most Recent Creation-Sortof

MY BOOK IS HERE! by EricGjerde.

So I originally was waiting until my ordered copy of Origami Tessellations:  Awe Inspiring Geometric Designs came to write a review about Eric’s new book, but while it hasn’t come a copy has come from another source.  To be fair this review is hardly unbiased as I know Eric and he is in part responsible for sending me down this path of obsession.  He is always trying to bring people into the tessellating fold and his book is part of this.

The book starts off explaining what a tessellation is, a basic history of origami tessellations,  and how to do a basic grid.  He shows the fundamentals of tessellation design, such as how to create pleate intersections both with a square based grid and a equilateral triangle based grid.  Interspersed throughout are pictures of tessellations that appear in Islamic architecture.    After showing basic twists and folds with computer illustrations he has a beginners section on tessellations.  Number two, Spread Hexagons, is my favorite, probably because it was the tessellation that he had out that I looked at when we met at OUSA (Oops edit 2.5 not 3.5 years ago).  Five by four has a beautifully modern look, while Chateau-Chinon by Christiane Bettens evokes traditional tilings.  His intermediate projects are great introductions to folding designs with more than one type of fold/twist.  My personal favorite in the book is Negative Space Stars, a design that seems impossible without cuts is clean and compelling.  The one side clean negative stars and the other a pattern that really evokes the Islamic Tessellations that I personally love so much.

At the end of the book is a gallery and has tessellations from a wide range of people; Robert Lang, Joel Cooper, Christiane Bettens, Chris Palmer, Polly Verity, Sipho Mabona, Eric (of course), and me.  I have to say it was very surprising when Eric first asked if he could include some of my tessellations as I hadn’t been folding tessellations very long.  The creating and designing of tessellations has exploded recently and I know that it is in large part to Eric, to the Flickr group he started and his website http://www.origamitessellations.com.  The book is as clear and concise as a book can be in teaching origami tessellations.  Purchasing a copy is a great idea for the math lover, origami lover, art lover, or just anyone who can find the beauty in the transformation of paper into art.

So order here http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1568814518?ie=UTF8&tag=origamitessel-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1568814518 or go to his website to order.

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Recent mod of an old and problematic tessellation.  I made the grid about a mm to small and it created a host of problems so I took photos and then modified it a bit.

Pretty old school for my tessellations design, but I like it well enough.

mm redux  by you.

mm redux  by you.

mm redux  by you.

mm redux  by you.

Origami Tessellation – “Framed Star Tessellation” Instructions

Framed Star Tessellation 12 by you.

Framed Star Tessellation 11 by you.

As some of you know I am fascinated with three dimensional tessellations. This is a different and much simpler process than I typically use, so I figured it lent itself more to online instructions. This does assume a certain level of ability. First the grid should really be 32nds if you want to get repeated stars. 16ths would allow you to make about one star I suspect. The grid I used was 48ths. For instructions on how to make a grid link to Eric’s origami tessellations website and look it up and that also goes for a triangle twist.

Step one is creating the first triangle twist.

Framed Star Tessellation 1

Secondly you arrange the grid as shown, as if to do another triangle twist. But don’t!

Framed Star Tessellation 2

Push the tip, where the lines intersect in.

Framed Star Tessellation 3 by you.

From the edge of the pushed in hexagon go over two spaces and arrange the pleats as if you are going to create a triangular twist. The repeat the “concave” hexagon.

Framed Star Tessellation 4 by you.

Framed Star Tessellation 5 by you.

Then going upwards from the new concave hexagon do the same thing. I also added a triangle twist on the outer edge of the emerging larger hexagon. Then another triangle twist on the middle “concave” hexagon.

Framed Star Tessellation 6 by you.

Keep repeating around, till you have formed a hexagon of the pushed in hexagons. The triangle twists are in the directions shown below, every other one faces the other.

Framed Star Tessellation 9 by you.

The other side is where it gets its name. This is the basic unit. The process repeats from each of the triangle twists. Refer to the first two pictures for the full tessellation.

Framed Star Tessellation 10 by you.

The nice thing is once you’ve constrained the free paper there are at least 10 easy mods that will change the form completely. I’ll leave them to you to find, but remember part of origami is discovery. Push things in a little differently and a new design is born.

Enjoy,

Christine

Soon I have a pillow that is a test I’ll publish.  The front is done I just need to pull out my sewing machine and filler.   I also had some earlier tests that collected dust, as most stuff I test does (by the necessity of time)   I pulled out and started playing with.  I am currently not friends with my  iron though.  I might splurge on a cord free one and I think I’ve come around to “investing” (that’s the word I’m using instead of indulging) in a craftrobo pro.