Archive for the ‘origami crease patterns’ Category

Proper Diagrams for Bulldog Bookmark

Bulldog Bookmark with link to instructions

Bulldog bookmark 1.1

So Himanshu Agrawal asked a week or two ago about doing diagrams for a bookmark I posted pictoral diagrams for and I said sure that sounds great.  Wow are his diagrams wonderful.  I did  not expect anything so wonderfully done and really appreciate the work he put into it.  Diagramming is a talent I don’t have and Himanshu’s diagrams are concise and even are colored.  He is on facebook and flickr.

Link to an amazing dragon done for Dell computers from his flickr pics-amazing!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/orukami/3962399562/

His flickr site is www.flickr.com/orukami and the diagrams are here Bulldog bookmark 1.1 .

New modular “Woven Wreath”/”Sun Dial” and some links I like

For people who have sent requests for things I apologize as I spent the better part of the last three weeks away from home and if it is for computer based candy container diagrams my other computer is not functioning right now.  I will send stuff when I have the computer up and running.  

As usual if anyone has seen this modular please post information and links as applicable.  The unit was designed to create the same effect (although with a completely seperate unit) that another 3d wreath has.  The units are not remotely similar, and sadly my unit does not have the flexibility or strength that the other one has.  The modular can be done in 8 or 20 depending on the variation, of which there are many.  The instructions are for the 20 unit variation.  As for the oddly bolded sections that is something the blog is doing and I can’t fix-since wordpress is free I can’t complain.

 

Woven Wreath with pictoral instructions

 

Woven Wreath

 

1.  Get 20 square sheets.  I recommend between 4-6 inches square.  Fold in half diagonally.Woven Wreath

2.  Fold as indicated and crease and then undo.

Woven WreathWoven Wreath

3.  Fold the bottom right edge to crease line

Woven WreathWoven Wreath

4.  Fold tips around edge and tuck them inside.

Woven WreathWoven WreathWoven Wreath

5.  Take top point and fold to bottom point and crease.

Woven Wreath

6.  Take the two flaps folded in the last step and fold inside the pocket.  You will have to reverse the direction of the crease on the front fold.

Woven WreathWoven Wreath

7.  Put the unit sideways and fold the tip so it is roughly parallel with the vertex of the obtuse angle.  Do it one and then rotate the unit and do it the other way.

Woven wreath

8.  Take the top point and fold down to 1/3 from the bottom and then let fold the unit back on step sevens creases.

Woven wreath

8.  Finished unit, make twenty total

Woven wreath

9.  Tuck in as indicated.  Make sure that you are tucked in on both sides.

Woven wreathWoven Wreath

10.  Keep adding units until you have the original photo.

 

Some fun sites.

http://www.archicentral.com/origami-chapel-st-loup-switzerland-local-architecture-771/

http://www.designshell.com/architecture/origami-inspired-bamboo-house.html

http://fcms.its.utas.edu.au/scieng/arch/cpage.asp?lCpageID=267

http://www.architecture.com.au/awards_search?option=showaward&entryno=2008031648

http://www.internimagazine.it/Dynamic/Publication,intCategoryID,72,intIssueID,306,intLangID,2.html

Another Year Another Fold

000_2759 by you.

I just got back from New York.  I arrived Thursday and came back today.  I stayed with Adrienne in Brooklyn in a converted garage.  Like last year I didn’t take classes, because I taught 5 classes and figured there wouldn’t be time.  I missed seeing “Into the Fold” but did get to meet a lot of interesting folks.  Interesting talk with Ray Schamp.  Added a new face to Yaffa, Goran.  Made a “purse.”  Slept little, enjoyed my time thoroughly.  Saw more of NY than usual.  One thing that sometimes gets lost with convention goers is that we are in New York which is a fabulous city and the 4 square blocks around FIT are not where the flavor is.  Harassed a bunch of people smarter than me about curvature and promptly “fired” them for not having the answer to my “sortoff” questions, although they both suggested I harass Erik Demaine which I will be doing as soon as I can craft an email that doesn’t make me feel slow.  My questions arn’t really concise or clear, simply put I don’t understand enough about curved rotation to understand what is going on.  

The people in my box design course did amazing and I was happy that everyone who attended my Labyrnth class understood the technique.  Ben Parker’s work has definately progressed and Joel is now working on busts along with the faces.  The form of the chest was amazing.  Seth has great work and I loved Sipho’s way of displaying models.  Goran has started pulling apart and approaching very organic nifty forms.  Ana Sofia helped me make two large models for the oversized folding challenge (Two thumbs up for Sok) and disappeared before I could say my goodbyes.  Joseph’s perfect piggy “Cleofis” has a lovely spot on my shelf (gracias oh Master JoWu;P.)  Michael was the most adorable child ever.  Brian Chan is still making amazing models and Alexander Soukas had lovely tessellations.  Daniel Kwan is probably the most precise folder ever and has little crease elves helping him.  Philip and Christiane were my first picture in NY and it was of their feet!  

Shoe Love by you.

We took a terrific three hour boat tour on Tuesday, thanks Eric (for everything).  A big thanks to Adrienne for her couch and her roommates tolerance of a squatter.

Adrienne and me 

000_2748 by you.
Ben Parker looking somber on boat
000_2755 by you.
My temporary bedroom and the plexiglass bridge
000_2737 by you.
The happy Wu

Bemused Wu by you.

Goran, Bernie, Joel

Goran

Bernie Peyton

Joel Cooper

Christianne, PCB, Tomohiro

Christiane

PCB

Tomohiro

Ape challenge, Sipho, Ben

Ape challenge.  I adore the pointing laughing monnkey

Sipho

Ben Parker

Oversized folding challenge (Photo also known as “Shri’s Bum”) Ray Schamp

Big folds and Shri's but

Ray Schamp

My exhibit (the blue thing is the curvy thing I wanted to ask questions about)

Me by you.

There were a bunch of things I sadly didn’t get photos of as I was rushing to do this before heading off to teach, so for the pictures I missed sorry and for everyone I had great conversations with thanks.

More photos here http://www.flickr.com/photos/christine42/

The photos are tagged “ousa 2009”

See you next year (maybe)

Thanks,

Christine

Instructable: Easter Egg Box

Made an instructable for one of the containers

http://www.instructables.com/id/Easter-Egg-or-Candy-container-computer-aided-orig/

Computer Aided Origami-Candy Boxes

So I reverse engineered a box for a friend that has the origins listed as a Japanese Anemone box that Christiane recognized as similar to a Fujimoto box.  They are all variations on a theme.  So I decided to play with curvature on these boxes and the results are below along with nondirectional crease patterns.  What was so interesting is that a slight change with where the curvature is makes a large difference in the end product.  So everything is creative commons on this site as always.  Hope you enjoy.  If you would like the viacad or adobe illustrator files email me and I can send them so you can tweak the design yourself.  Remember playing with a design is half the fun.

 

candy three by you.

candy container cp by you.

000_2405 by you.

000_2398 by you.

 

000_2387 by you.

This particular design is reminiscent of the collapsible lids.  I also employed these nibs in a box I did awhile back.

000_2391 by you.

000_2388 by you.

Instructions for Pleated Origami Dress From a Square

1.  This starts from a square.  I recommend a thin paper, kami is fine.  Fold in half lengthwise and then quarter.  

000_2113

2.  Then fold in eighths as shown above.

000_2114

3.  Flip over.

000_2116000_2118

4.  From the eighth crease to the left of the center crease you will fold it 1/3 away from the center line.  You will repeat this action 2 more times on  that side.  Then repeat on the other side.

000_2119

5.  Mountain fold to a little less than a third away from the bottom.  A lot of these folds are to taste.

000_2120

6.  Then fold back up-about a quarter inch.

000_2121000_2124

7,8.  A little less than a half inch below mountain fold and then bring it back down about a quarter.  This is the belt area and will be fairly thick.  Mountain fold the dress back down to get the belt as shown in the picture.

000_2125000_2126

9.  You are spreading  the pleat in the back so the edge from the tip of the pleat goes to the bottom of the dress. It folds back on the first pleat.  You can see the light mountain folds in the previous step.   The spread to the top is to taste.

000_2128000_2129

000_2130

 

10.  If you like the neckline as is you’re done, otherwise(this works better if the belt is bigger and the bodice shorter)….To do the neckline mountain fold as indicated symmetrically on both sides.  Fold the rest on a curve to taste.  

000_2131

11.  To flatten on the back you will need to spread the pleats a bit.

000_2134

000_2136000_2137000_2138

12.  These are minor variations.  I did a small inside reverse fold on the bottom, then I did it to the other side.  The final dress I pulled apart the skirt pleats lightly and enlarged the belt so it became more of a bodice.

 

It is easy to play with these and simple corrugations will work fine in the skirt area.  Changing the size of the belt and how you fold the neckline can greatly modify the aesthetics of the dress.  Plus it would be easy to play with the bodice pleats.

“Takeout” Box Instructions and First Pillow Test

Takeout container version One in vellum by you.Takeout container version two by you.

Takeout container version one in vellum by you.

This is one of those folds that is so simple that I suspect it has to have been designed before. What I really like about it is it’s strength and good use of paper. Its 3 in high and a 3.5 by 3.5 inch. Given that this vellum started out as a regular 8.5×11 cut into a 8.5 inch square I think the space that is kept is great and it is very strong, as demonstrated

As is usual if this has been done before please post applicable information and a link if possible.

Instructions start here

http://www.flickr.com/photos/christine42/3205167722/

Also I am posting a really rough first draft of a pillow based off the Oceania Box. Eric’s comment about made me think about some earlier faux suede I tried tessellating this summer. I think I may have to suck it up and buy some real suede or leather to get the body that I want for the design.

First test "oceania" pillow by you.

The faux suede does not have enough body to hold the separated to curve the pleats. Freehanding the ironing not a good idea. My eyeball isn’t that good. I should sew across the base of the pleats before sewing for assembly. When I bought this I was at an upholstery fabric store. I absolutely loved a vivid turquoise blue leather that I saw, this was bought in place of leather cause of cost. I will play with this more when I have time.

Origami Tessellation – “Framed Star Tessellation” Instructions

Framed Star Tessellation 12 by you.

Framed Star Tessellation 11 by you.

As some of you know I am fascinated with three dimensional tessellations. This is a different and much simpler process than I typically use, so I figured it lent itself more to online instructions. This does assume a certain level of ability. First the grid should really be 32nds if you want to get repeated stars. 16ths would allow you to make about one star I suspect. The grid I used was 48ths. For instructions on how to make a grid link to Eric’s origami tessellations website and look it up and that also goes for a triangle twist.

Step one is creating the first triangle twist.

Framed Star Tessellation 1

Secondly you arrange the grid as shown, as if to do another triangle twist. But don’t!

Framed Star Tessellation 2

Push the tip, where the lines intersect in.

Framed Star Tessellation 3 by you.

From the edge of the pushed in hexagon go over two spaces and arrange the pleats as if you are going to create a triangular twist. The repeat the “concave” hexagon.

Framed Star Tessellation 4 by you.

Framed Star Tessellation 5 by you.

Then going upwards from the new concave hexagon do the same thing. I also added a triangle twist on the outer edge of the emerging larger hexagon. Then another triangle twist on the middle “concave” hexagon.

Framed Star Tessellation 6 by you.

Keep repeating around, till you have formed a hexagon of the pushed in hexagons. The triangle twists are in the directions shown below, every other one faces the other.

Framed Star Tessellation 9 by you.

The other side is where it gets its name. This is the basic unit. The process repeats from each of the triangle twists. Refer to the first two pictures for the full tessellation.

Framed Star Tessellation 10 by you.

The nice thing is once you’ve constrained the free paper there are at least 10 easy mods that will change the form completely. I’ll leave them to you to find, but remember part of origami is discovery. Push things in a little differently and a new design is born.

Enjoy,

Christine

Soon I have a pillow that is a test I’ll publish.  The front is done I just need to pull out my sewing machine and filler.   I also had some earlier tests that collected dust, as most stuff I test does (by the necessity of time)   I pulled out and started playing with.  I am currently not friends with my  iron though.  I might splurge on a cord free one and I think I’ve come around to “investing” (that’s the word I’m using instead of indulging) in a craftrobo pro.

Winterland in Wisconsin: A Few Folds and an Old but Not Forgotten Box

So I was in Wisconsin, at Lake Harris. I think winter is the time that we are gifted with seeing a tree’s architecture. The pristine lines don’t err and aim towards the heavens against a backdrop of Robin’s egg blue. The stark Birches and lily white snow were beautiful if bitterly cold. So amidst the joy of grading papers I folded.

Oceania Box-Older box, but one that I still like.   I don’t think I’ve posted it here before.

Oceania Box by you.

Partial Diagram: After step 6 just make a standard masu box. The edge reference for the edge of the box is the first pleat from the edge. Make two. Then pull apart the sections carefully, fanning them out. Make two.

Rough Diagrams for Oceania Box by you.

In Wisconsin I played around with 2d modulars again. Before I post instructions I would like to know if they are already floating out there in the origami ether.   If you recognize them please state who and a link if possible.   I checked out a site moduladia? and a site by a gentleman whose website escapes me at the moment.   So if the designs and or modules look familiar I do appreciate information before I bother trying to diagram.

Some Modulars made in Wisconsin by you.

Last thing  from the cold northwoods is a tessellation.   Was originally going to do a mask , but sadly that, as usual, was pushed to the side.  So here it is backlit.

Kaleidoscopic by you.


Hope you all have a safe and happy new year.

Philipily Quatre Bowl Instructions and a few links

Philipily Quatre Angled and locked by you.

Philipily Quatre Top no lock by you.

This bowl is part of a curved computer aided tessellation I am working on. The collapsing of it is going poorly, but looking at a bowl of Philips I realized it might make a good bowl if I used one iteration overlaid in a circle. The original design is based on a equilateral triangle. The design works with any number of sides of a polygon with little modification.

To complete print out the crease pattern below as large as will fit on a sheet of paper.

CP-"Philipily Quatre" by you.

Then score the creases following the lines above. I recommend a pen that no longer has ink. Then make the creases as shown below.

Philipily Quatre-Directional Crease pattern by you.

This is the bottom.

Philipily Quatre Bottom no lock by you.

This is the top.

Philipily Quatre Top no lock by you.

To try the five sided bowl the crease pattern is below.

CP-"Philipily Cinq" by you.

Links that I sent to the o-list but forgot to given the e-mail a subject.

Some origami in fashion links.

http://sxyfashionqueen.blogspot.com/2008/12/sfq-answers-lady-gagas-origami-dress.html

This is more tangentially related. The fabrics were inspired by traditional papers and they may have origami birds on one blouse, but the pic wasn’t good enough to be positive.

http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/japan-fashion-influences-bruno-basso-and-christopher-brooke-do-origami-prin

Nifty top
http://www.net-a-porter.com/product/36765

jacket
http://www.net-a-porter.com/product/35303

shoes that appear to have little leather blintz folds.
http://www.net-a-porter.com/product/27268

Chair and stool with origami design influence
http://www.shearyadi.com/myworld/the-multidisciplinary-work-of-designs-from-so-takahashi/

Purse with a fold or two.
http://www.topshop.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?beginIndex=0&viewAllFlag=true&catalogId=19551&storeId=12556&categoryId=74447&parent_category_rn=130031&productId=907600&langId=-1

While I am sure you are all familiar with Sipho Mabona’s extraordinary work, he has a website that is as exquisitely constructed as his designs. Check out his site. My favorite pick is his Multiple white Koi picture. Bella.

http://www.mabonaorigami.com/

Happy Holidays,

Christine