Archive for the ‘Modular Origami Diagrams’ Category

Been Awhile

So I have been, comparatively, out of commision to a large extent the last two years.  Work and getting a graduate degree took precedence over life, liberty, pursuit of happiness, and all that jazz.  Here is what I did in the last week and two modular instructions for units I did (sometime in the last several years, probably more recently, but memory is a fallible, short-term, gnat like thing for me) no guarantees they are not redundant.

Links to two modulars

Waterbomb Modular Instructions

Standard disclaimer:  The simpler the unit the more likely it’s been done before, please post information and links if you’ve seen it, done it, or something very similar.  Creative commons applies to all and have a happy new year.

Waterbomb modular30Waterbomb modular30 30 units

Waterbomb modular 12Waterbomb modular 12 and 6 units respectively

Waterbomb modularWaterbomb modularWaterbomb modular

1.  Fold in half.   2.  flip over and fold bottom edge to center, same on top.   3.  What it should look like.

Waterbomb modularWaterbomb modularWaterbomb modular

4.  Fold quarter fold to center repeat on top   5.  Vertical view.  6.  Side view.

Waterbomb modularWaterbomb modularWaterbomb modular

7, 8.  Fold bottom edge to right edge and then bottom edge to left edge. 9.  Collapse to a waterbomb.  Repeat on other side.

Waterbomb modularWaterbomb modular

10.  Fold in half to the smooth sides of the two waterbombs meet.  Refer to picture 11.  that is the final unit

I recommend the 12 or 30 unit first as they are easier to assemble.  Refer to picks for connections at each vertex.  The twelve unit is functionally a cube and the 30 unit a dodecahedron.

Happy holidays from sock monkey.

Waterbomb modular with sock monkey

Dollar Bill Wreath and Inchworm

So I have ended up on a tangent that I would eventually like to use for posting tutorials for my students and have lectures students can view if absent.  So I decided to try to create an origami tutorial.  I may have done this design before I sadly don’t remember.  Editing is a challenging business, as is seeing yourself (in all your redundant glory) on camera.  So for those who do post tutorials online kudos, it’s a lot harder than it looks.  I will within the next week post about Italy, but this comes first since it’s done.  Bear with me as it is my first attempt at video instruction and it is not polished all pretty, plus I am using the camera in my mac which doesn’t allow for as much flexibility in filming.  Youtube said it’s processing so here you go, remember creative commons applies to all unless stated otherwise.  Happy holidays.

Below is an corrugated automata that doesn’t inch the way I originally plan, but sometimes the best laid plans fail.

InchWorm

New modular “Woven Wreath”/”Sun Dial” and some links I like

For people who have sent requests for things I apologize as I spent the better part of the last three weeks away from home and if it is for computer based candy container diagrams my other computer is not functioning right now.  I will send stuff when I have the computer up and running.  

As usual if anyone has seen this modular please post information and links as applicable.  The unit was designed to create the same effect (although with a completely seperate unit) that another 3d wreath has.  The units are not remotely similar, and sadly my unit does not have the flexibility or strength that the other one has.  The modular can be done in 8 or 20 depending on the variation, of which there are many.  The instructions are for the 20 unit variation.  As for the oddly bolded sections that is something the blog is doing and I can’t fix-since wordpress is free I can’t complain.

 

Woven Wreath with pictoral instructions

 

Woven Wreath

 

1.  Get 20 square sheets.  I recommend between 4-6 inches square.  Fold in half diagonally.Woven Wreath

2.  Fold as indicated and crease and then undo.

Woven WreathWoven Wreath

3.  Fold the bottom right edge to crease line

Woven WreathWoven Wreath

4.  Fold tips around edge and tuck them inside.

Woven WreathWoven WreathWoven Wreath

5.  Take top point and fold to bottom point and crease.

Woven Wreath

6.  Take the two flaps folded in the last step and fold inside the pocket.  You will have to reverse the direction of the crease on the front fold.

Woven WreathWoven Wreath

7.  Put the unit sideways and fold the tip so it is roughly parallel with the vertex of the obtuse angle.  Do it one and then rotate the unit and do it the other way.

Woven wreath

8.  Take the top point and fold down to 1/3 from the bottom and then let fold the unit back on step sevens creases.

Woven wreath

8.  Finished unit, make twenty total

Woven wreath

9.  Tuck in as indicated.  Make sure that you are tucked in on both sides.

Woven wreathWoven Wreath

10.  Keep adding units until you have the original photo.

 

Some fun sites.

http://www.archicentral.com/origami-chapel-st-loup-switzerland-local-architecture-771/

http://www.designshell.com/architecture/origami-inspired-bamboo-house.html

http://fcms.its.utas.edu.au/scieng/arch/cpage.asp?lCpageID=267

http://www.architecture.com.au/awards_search?option=showaward&entryno=2008031648

http://www.internimagazine.it/Dynamic/Publication,intCategoryID,72,intIssueID,306,intLangID,2.html

Dollar Sun-Another Day Another Dollar Fold

Stellated 12-gon.  If you skip step 5 or vary the distance of the fold you change the number of modules needed.  Given an n-gon the smaller the fold to the center the larger n (i.e. the number of bills) is.

“Dollar Flower & Stem” Diagrams and “Petal Bottom Bowl” (Plus Flax Test)

Had to redo the diagrams as the originals went to the Land of the Lost.  The second group of photos is work on combining boxpleating and goran pleating with deconstruction.  This is most recent in a series.  If interested more shots are on flickr.  http://flickr.com/photos/christine42/  I also tested some flax with this pleating to see how it held up.  If I can get large enough sheets I will probably also do some more with flax.

 

 

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day

000_8632.jpg

Oh St. Patty’s day is near!!!  For many (I am only speaking of Chicago, cause that’s what I know)  it is special day celebrated in any place that serves alcohol, by the Green Chicago River, or at the parade.  In honor of such a green holiday I am posting triangular pyramid tip box instructions and a Celtic cross modular (In deference to it being the holiday of a saint and all.)  The tip box is made from a bill and closes.  You can fit the coins that go with the tip in it.  Remember your server is harried and tip generously.  The box was inspired by this box from Lorenzo Marchi.  http://flickr.com/photos/lorenzomarchi/227362566/

The modular is of an almost identical unit that an Italian folder, Franco Pavarin, published, with one difference. I wrap a section around another section that forces a color change and it does change assembly methodology a bit.  Thanks to Mark Kennedy for helping me get the information to clear that up.  I like my unit better because it is stronger during assembly for at least the one completed modular.  I made two with his and as I found the assembly to be harder.  Soon I will post the 15 assembly varients I made. 

Tip Box Instructions

1.  Fold the creases as shown.  Make the crease bidirectional i.e. fold in in both directions.

2.  The vertices of the two squares are pulled down to meet each other.  This action cause the basic two triangular pyramids to form.

000_8668.jpg

3.  In the triangle that is in the middle you are pushing up the triangle tip.  You are using pre-existing creases.

4.  Inside I pink the edges of the pyramid and flatten them clockwise.  The second picture is what the bottom looks like.

5.  You are flipping up the rim of the top of the container all the way around.

6.  The bit of bill connecting the top and the bottom needs to be creased so the top can fit in the bottom.

7.  The extra flap needs to be folded so it is the same size as the rim.  I folded it in on pre-existing creases.

8.  The tips are folded in so that the flap can hold the lid closed.

 9.  Congratulations close the box…you are done.

More Modular Madness

000_8593.jpg 

This modular is an amazing frisbee and while I don’t necessarily advocate “throwing money around” in this case I say make an exception.  Quite thick at the edges, but it is a sturdy octagon.

Very crude instructions here http://www.flickr.com/photos/christine42/2327491169/in/photostream/

Pentagonal Star-Really Pentagonalish.  Although it lies flat the fit is not perfect.  Not a unique style connection, but I like pentagons.

Varients on previously diagrammed model.  Hexagon in Embedded Star and Embedded star.  The first is a forced fold, not natural and does not lie flat.  The second is the flat variation.

Same disclaimer/request if you have seen these please post applicable designers and links.  Thanks:)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 46 other followers